Categories
Child Abuse

Pediatric Burns

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta has a streaming Grand Rounds webcast available: Burns in Pediatrics–Abuse, Accident or Outlier? It’s available free of charge, but requires registration with the site. Unfortunately, this one is also CMEs only, but is certainly relevant for clinicians across the board. (I’m working on finding some new relevant nursing CEs, but there are a lot less of those, sorry.)

Categories
Uncategorized

Suicide in the Elderly

Medscape has a short CME offering on suicide in the geriatric population: Sedatives & Hypnotics May Increase Risk for Suicide in Elderly Patients. 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ available (Family Physicians – maximum of 0.25 AAFP Prescribed credit(s)). This is a standard article-posttest format, based on a study published this month in BMC Geriatrics.

Categories
Uncategorized

Caring for Pediatric/Adolescent LGBT Patients

The Children’s Hospital of Denver has an archived grand rounds presentation on caring for LGBT patients and their families in pediatric and adolescent medicine that was initially presented last November. It’s a 40 minute video with Powerpoint slides, and I particularly like that it’s focused on peds, since that subset of this specialized patient population is even less well represented in the online continuing education offerings.

Sadly, they don’t provide CEs for video archives, so no love there.

Categories
Uncategorized

Disaster Mental Health

I have had what could be benignly called a very long travel day (involving groundstops, flying through thunderstorms, airport power outages, and the like). It’s far later than I planned to be posting for today (actually yesterday now), so this is a short and simple one for those of you interested in traumatic stress and emotional trauma: from David Baldwin’s Trauma Information Pages, his comprehensive listing of online disaster mental health resources. I don’t normally just highlight a page of links as the sole content for a post, but this one is so exhaustive, I figured it’s a great resource to add to the arsenal.

Categories
Uncategorized

Weekly Wrap-Up @ the Sustainability Blog

Next week I will be traveling to the surface of the sun Bakersfield, CA and will be gone most of the week, so posts may be a bit lighter, depending on how my time ends up being use while I’m there. But that’s next week. This week, over at the sustainability site:

Have a great weekend, everyone!

Categories
Child Abuse Sexual Assault

Clinical Guide: Toluidine Blue Dye

Research

There’s been very little written about TB dye in the peer reviewed literature over the past 30 years, so I have included all of it (that I could find) here. Some discuss the utility of TB dye in greater depth than others. As with any research, it is imperative that you read these articles (particularly the older ones) with a critical eye toward the methodology used and the relevance of their findings in light of advances in the science. All links go to PubMed abstracts.

Factors that influence the variability in findings of anogenital injury in adolescent/adult sexual assault victims: a review of the forensic literature. (Laitinen, et al., 2013)

Reliability of female genital injury detection after sexual assault. (Sachs, et al., 2011)

Comparison of methods for identifying ano-genital injury after consensual intercourse. (Zink, et al., 2009)

Validation set correlates of anogenital injury after sexual assault. (Drocton, et al. 2008)

Significance of toluidine blue positive findings after speculum examination for sexual assault. (Jones, et al., 2004)

Signs of genital trauma in adolescent rape victims examined acutely. (Adams, et al., 2000)

Effects of toluidine blue and destaining reagents used in sexual assault examinations on the ability to obtain DNA profiles from postcoital vaginal swabs. (Hochmeister, et al., 1997)

Medical assessment of children who have been recently raped. (Kaufhold, 1993. No abstract available; full citation: Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, Volume 2, Issue 1, 1993, Pages 105 – 112)

Toluidine blue in the detection at autopsy of perineal and perianal victims of sexual abuse. (Bays & Lewman, 1992)

Toluidine blue in the detection of perineal lacerations in pediatric and adolescent sexual abuse victims. (McCauley, et al., 1986)

Use of toluidine blue for documentation of traumatic intercourse. (Lauber & Souma, 1982)

(See also: NIJ’s Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Examination Research Forum: Examination Technology for current research questions about TB Dye)

Books

Some of the textbooks make mention of TB dye and its application. I’ve included links to them via Google Books. Just like with the research articles, read with a critical eye–I’m not endorsing any particular textbook, just giving you the particulars of where to find the information.

Atlas of Sexual Violence (Henry, pp. 100-101)

Forensic Emergency Medicine (2nd Ed.). (Olshaker, et al. pp. 99-101)

Obstetric & Gynecologic Emergencies. (Pearlman, et al., p. 478)

Forensic Nursing. (Pyrek, p. 164)

Clinical Forensic Medicine. (Stark, pp. 92-93).

Manual of Forensic & Emergency Medicine. (Riviello, pp. 115-116)

Color Atlas of Sexual Assault (Girardin, et al., pp. 102, 120-121)

Sexual Assault Across the Lifespan (Girardin, et al. starting on p. 661)

Sexual Assault (Crowley, pp. 85-86: no page views in Google Books)

 

National Protocol for Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Examinations*

Search toluidine blue dye to find the various areas where TB dye is mentioned

*many state and local protocols address TB dye use, but those are too numerous to include here

To Purchase:

Single dose applicators (25 or 50/box): National Forensic Nursing Institute

{and some general commentary here…}

 

Categories
Uncategorized

Funding Alert

A new funding alert is available from VAWNet for those of you interested in the money-end of things. You can read it in full here (PDF):

Categories
Sexual Assault

Sexual Assault on College Campuses

The Ash Institute at Harvard’s Kennedy School has an amazing series of “expert chats” with topics near and dear to my heart. One of the archived chats is Sexual Assault on College Campuses, and it features some incredibly knowledgeable speakers, including Dr. David Lisak and Marnie Shiels from the Office on Violence Against Women. You must register with the site to access the archived materials, which is free.

Categories
Uncategorized

Hate Crime Violence in the Workplace

Peace@Work is offering a webinar (actually a repeat, since it was originally offered June 19th) on “Hate Crime as Workplace Violence & Prevention” June 25th at 4pm EDT. Cost is $20. You can check out a full description of the webinar and other upcoming webinars here. As the name implies, Peace@Work provides training on workplace violence and prevention, so their educational offerings are all in that vein.

Categories
DV/IPV

Risk Analysis and Lethality Assessment in DV Cases

The Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum is sponsoring a webinar on June 30th from 12-1pm Pacific. Enhancing  Safety Planning for Survivors of Domestic Violence Using Risk Analysis and Lethality Assessment “will offer a practical and effective approach to understanding and managing the complexity of safety-planning for victims and survivors of domestic violence. It will focus on risk analysis and assessing for lethality of situation as critical steps in developing a safety plan. The webinar will also include special considerations for safety-planning for Asian battered women, such as the presence of multiple perpetrators in the home.” Participation is free, but space is limited, so register in advance if you plan to attend.

UPDATE: You can view the presentation slides here.

Categories
Uncategorized

Bioterrorism & Emerging Disease Preparedness

Rutgers College of Nursing has 8 online courses on bioterrorism and emerging disease preparedness. They all carry contact hours and range from $10-$70 depending on the number of hours you earn (looks like it’s roughly $10 per CE, give or take a few bucks).

Categories
Uncategorized

Weekly Wrap-Up @ the Sustainability Blog

Thunderstorms here in the CLE and nothing but rain in this weekend’s forecast. Perfect weather for staying inside and putting together a new clinical guide for this site (hopefully to be released early next week). In the meantime, check out some of the previous ones here and here (this one remains the site’s most visited page). And head over to the Sustainability site for a couple goodies, as well:

Enjoy your weekend, everyone!

Categories
Uncategorized

Critical Incident Response in the Workplace

Crisis Care Network has an online training, Best Practices in Critical Incident Response in the Workplace. The course provides attendees with a video-enhanced overview of best practices in critical incident response services. This program summarizes the latest findings in evidence based behavioral medicine as it relates to psychological first aid, addresses the unique aspects of the provider’s role with the employer client and provides an overview of how to deliver critical incident response services in the workplace. This program covers:

Categories
DV/IPV Sexual Assault

Working with LGBTIQ Survivors of Violence

OVC is hosting a web forum June 24th at 2pm on best practices for assisting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersexed, and queer (LGBTIQ) survivors of violence. As with other OVC web forums, questions are submitted in advance and then discussed live during the foum. For information on how to participate click here. You can view previous web forum discussions here.

Categories
Uncategorized

Cyberbullying

In April, the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (HRSA) held a webcast on cyberbullying. You can download the slides (PDF) from the webcast on their site, but unfortunately there’s no audio accompanying it. Still the slides have some good info and both prevention and intervention are addressed. There’s definitely an educator bent to the talk, but I think healthcare providers, particularly those dealings with kids/teens, will find a lot of the information helpful.

Categories
Sexual Assault

False Allegations

MNCASA is sponsoring a webinar on responding to false allegations of sexual assault, Monday, June 29th from 12-1:30 CDT. From the announcement: False reports of sexual assault are rare yet they attract significant attention from the media and influence public opinion about the prevalence of sexual violence. The webinar will explore this challenging issue from a number of perspectives, with the overall goal of providing tools that will help you respond effectively to difficult questions about victim credibility.

Categories
Uncategorized

Invisible Injuries of War

The Coming Home Project, a non-profit organization devoted to providing compassionate care, support and stress management tools for Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, their families, and their service providers, has a series of videos and podcasts on a host of different issues related to the physical and mental health needs of returning service men and women.

Categories
Sexual Assault

HIV Post Exposure Prophylaxis & Sexual Assault

Okay, so this is one of the webinars I’ve been waiting for: IAFN is hosting a webinar on HIV PEP that should be stellar (if I wasn’t going to be flying home from California that day, I would already be registered for this one). It will be held July 2nd from 2-3:30 pm ET, and it is free, people. Free. No CEs, sadly, but good (much needed) content.

Topics to be covered during the webinar include incidence of post sexual assault HIV infection; the  role of  advocacy for HIV counseling and assistance for victims related to HIV; the role and responsibility of the SANE for HIV PEP; and an ‘algorithm’ approach for the programs to use for HIV PEP.

Categories
Child Abuse DV/IPV

Children Exposed to Domestic Violence

The International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect is hosting a Virtual Issues Discussion (VID), beginning June 15th through the 22nd. The discussion will specifically be on Approaches to Children Exposed to Domestic Violence. Advanced registration is required. You can see a list of presenters and access supplemental materials here.

Categories
Uncategorized

Weekly Wrap-Up @ the Sustainability Blog

It was a busy week at the sustainability site. I’m happy to return with a new Friday Q&A, this time from IAFN Past-President, Stacey Mitchell. You can read her fantastic responses to the questionnaire here. Also this week:

  • A resource many of you know from this site, The Ultimate Educator and tools for creating courses for adult learners
  • One of those simple, but amazing tools that can distill down the overwhelming into the doable: Performance Vistas’s Decision Selection Matrix
  • A webinar (free!) over at the Goodman Center focusing on their recent survey on using online technologies instead of in-person meetings and conferences–they’ll be discussing the good, the bad, and I’m sure, the ugly during the 1-hour event (love their stuff, BTW).

That’s it for me–I’m knocking off early to spend time with my kiddo after being gone all week. Enjoy your weekend!