Categories
Elder Abuse/Neglect

Funding Opportunity: OVW Enhanced Training and Services to End Abuse in Later Life Program

I get a lot of questions about program expansion, particularly related to 1.) education; and 2.) funding. Here’s a session that will address the latter, at least as it relates to elder abuse programming. OVW and the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life (NCALL) are hosting a webinar to discuss previous grantees in the Enhanced Training and Services to End Abuse in Later Life grant program and address the necessary steps to apply for these funds. It will be held June 15th, World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, at 2pm ET. From the announcement:

Each day, 10,000 baby boomers turn 65. As the number of older individuals in America increases, unfortunately so does the number of potential victims of elder abuse. Research indicates that one in ten older adults are abused and that two-thirds of elder abuse victims are women. This webinar on June 15 – World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD) – will commemorate WEAAD 2017 and the efforts of communities and professional around the county to confront elder abuse. This webinar will also provide participants with a detailed overview of OVW’s Enhanced Training and Services to End Abuse in Later Life grant program. This grant program funds communities across the country to address elder abuse through trainings, services, and a coordinated community response. Participants will hear from previous years’ grantees about the impact the grant program has had on their community’s response to abuse in later life. Participants will also learn about steps they can take to prepare to apply for the grant.

Register for the webinar here.

 

Categories
Sexual Assault

Human Trafficking: Identifying & Responding to Victims in the Healthcare Setting

The National Criminal Justice Training Center is hosting a webinar, Human Trafficking: Identifying and Responding to Victims in the Healthcare Setting. The session will be held June 7th at 2pm ET. From the announcement:

A 2017 survey report from the Coalition to Abolish Slavery & Trafficking (CAST) found that over half of labor and sex trafficking survivors surveyed had accessed health care at least once while being trafficked. Nearly 97% indicated they had never been provided with information or resources about human trafficking while visiting the health care provider. This webinar will present strategies to equip healthcare professionals to identify and appropriately assist trafficked persons with victim-centered, trauma-informed care and services.

Register here.

Categories
Articles of Note Uncategorized

Articles of Note, May 2017 Edition

It’s time once again for Articles of Note, a walk through the recently published, peer-reviewed research. While the list this month isn’t particularly lengthy, my nerdy heart was more than pleased with what I found. I encourage you to spend some time with the list, as there’s a lot here that’s relevant to practice. As always I am including a Word doc and a PDF, one for live links, one for easy distribution and printing. And as always, a plea that you attribute appropriately if you use my work.

 

Categories
Uncategorized

Since Last We Spoke, 5-22-17

Greetings from Ft Sill, OK, where I have been working all weekend. Not much time online, with the exception of hanging around in airports. Still, plenty to read when I checked my feeds– some uplifting, some bleak. And I see that many of you are at Crimes Against Women in Dallas. Hope you all enjoy yourselves, that’s an enjoyable one. For everyone else, here’s what’s caught my eye since last we spoke:

Decidedly not good news for crime victims

We should have listened to the broken teenagers...

No surprise, this

Who should you listen to on abortion?

The impact of poverty on a life (the title alone…)

A deeper dive on the crisis of gun violence (and IPV)

The impact of the current healthcare bill on the lives of children

All I have is heartbreak and rage (and bewilderment that this story isn’t even bigger)

Finally, animation about how early trauma impacts a child’s brain:

Categories
Uncategorized

An Animated Tour of the Invisible

I am working on the new session I am doing in Kansas next month (subtitled: Preparing for the Unknown and the Unknowable), and in looking for a particular resource, I somehow stumbled upon this TEDEd video, An Animated Tour of the Invisible. Thinking about what we do know in our own work (and honestly, what really is unknowable), I found this short cartoon absolutely fascinating, with the very last statement in the piece bringing it all home. Since it’s Friday, and I am prepping for a week on the road starting tomorrow, I leave you with it so you, too, can ponder the great mysteries of the world. Enjoy.

 

Categories
Uncategorized

Forensic Photography Webinar

The Tribal Forensic Healthcare project has an upcoming webinar, Forensic Photography. The session will be held June 14th at 2pm ET. CEUs are available for this session. From the announcement:

This webinar will cover general photography methods, forensic aspects of photography, and specific methods which should be applied in SANE cases. The specific methods will include scale photography of injuries, the use of forensic light sources for revealing latent evidence, and depth-of-field/lens/focus concerns with intra-cavity photos (including photography related to the use of a speculum). 

Ryan Rezzelle will be the featured speaker.

Categories
DV/IPV

Intimate Partner Violence and Strangulation in the Deaf Community

The Training Institute on Strangulation Prevention is hosting a webinar, Intimate Partner Violence and Strangulation in the Deaf Community. It will be held May 31st at 1pm ET. From the announcement:

This previously recorded webinar will provide an in-depth look at intimate partner violence and strangulation with the deaf community. Several case studies will be used to demonstrate the importance of understanding the unique differences between hearing and deaf and hard of hearing peoples’ experience of intimate partner violence and strangulation. Special concerns and challenges such as the use of interpreters, interviews, and working with deaf people who may have language deprivation (little or no sign language) will also be addressed.

Register for the webinar here.

Categories
DV/IPV

Patient-Centered Approach to Domestic Violence in Health Settings

Sorry about no post yesterday–I have no excuse, I just flaked (I was playing catch up after being gone all last week). But I’m back, with a new webinar from Futures Without Violence, and it’s a good topic. Patient-Centered Approach to Domestic Violence in Health Settings is being offered May 25th at 3pm ET. The session will be reviewing some new resources, specifically http://ipvhealth.org/ and http://ipvhealthpartners.org/. CMEs are available for physicians {and it looks like CEs for nurses licensed in CA(?)}. From the announcement:

With the screening and brief counseling recommendations in the US Preventive Service Task Force, many are looking for the best evidence-based screening tool for domestic violence to use in health settings. However, research suggests that disclosure-based responses to domestic violence are limiting because they constrain our opportunities for prevention and limits education to only those who are ready to disclose and who have been screened appropriately. Additionally, in the quest for the right screening question, the intervention is often overlooked. This webinar offers an approach that incorporates patient-centered brief interventions that are evidence-based and easy-to-implement as well as domestic violence advocacy partnership-building strategies. This webinar will feature new online tools for health providers and advocates, www.IPVhealth.org and www.IPVhealthpartners.org.

I haven’t reviewed the new sites they’re highlighting, but I’m always in favor of looking at how we better serve these patients and collaborate with community partners, so my hope is these will be valuable. Don’t forget, IAFN also has education guidelines that “select a standardized body of scientific knowledge for the medical/forensic evaluation of the patient experiencing IPV”. If you don’t have a copy, you can download the IPV Education Guidelines here.

Categories
Elder Abuse/Neglect

Elder Abuse Multidisciplinary Team Guide and Toolkit

The Department of Justice’s Elder Justice Initiative is hosting a webinar to review their new MDT guide and toolkit. The session will be held May 3oth from 2-3pm ET, and is for anyone interested in starting or growing an elder abuse MDT in their own community. According to their website, the web-based toolkit “is enhanced for use on mobile devices and contains easy to download PDF sample documents and citations.” Worth checking out.

Register here.

 

Categories
Child Abuse

Serving Those Most at Risk: Embracing The Challenge of Serving Trans Youth

Midwest Regional Children’s Advocacy Center has a webinar coming up, Serving Those Most at Risk: Embracing the Challenge of Serving Trans Youth. The session will be held June 22, from 1-2:30 pm CT. From the announcement:

Changes in the visibility of trans and gender diverse people in the last 3-5 years have dramatically changed the landscape for our community from a tiny minority to a visible stakeholder group globally. While youth feel empowered to embrace authenticity in their gender identities in an unprecedented way, trans youth face many challenges, including inconsistent family support, lack of access to resources and healthcare, discriminatory laws, and peer and institutional victimization. This leads to many harms for trans youth, including substantially increased risks of suicide, homelessness, commercial sexual exploitation, and substance abuse. Outgoing Vice President Biden has gone as far as to call transgender rights the “civil rights issue of our time.” As leaders in service to at-risk youth, Children’s Advocacy Centers have unique opportunities to be at the vanguard of supporting these youth and their families, and in doing so, may create safer, more nurturing communities for all youth. This talk explores trans and gender diverse identities in youth, challenges, barriers, and risks trans youth face, and approaches to best practice in enhancing service to this population.

Register for the webinar here.

Categories
Uncategorized

Since Last We Spoke, 5-8-17 (Nurses Week Edition)

Happy Monday–I’m sitting in the United Club at DCA as I post this, waiting to board a flight to Nashville (well, to ORD and then Nashville, since my original flight got cancelled. But hey, I get to eat at my favorite airport eatery in the US, so all good). Looking forward to teaching smart, interesting colleagues this week, so even though I will hit 3 cities by week’s end, I’m thoroughly looking forward to what’s ahead. And since I’m traveling, you know I have some time for surfing–here’s what’s caught my eye since last we spoke:

Happy nurses week to all my friends and colleagues. IAFN is offering a freebie for members, and it’s a good one.

Feelings at work

Seriously, our job announcements are dreadful

Still so much work to be done. (Related)

This is perfection

Definitely a lesson for providers

Guilty (got to stop this)

What a lovely bubble he must live in

Also, this (rolls eyes, lights hair on fire, considers which part of Canada I might enjoy living in most)

FGM–what does it do to a woman?

Categories
Sexual Assault

Examination Options after Sexual Assault: Do Survivors Have to Report?

The Tribal Forensic Healthcare project has a new webinar coming up, Examination Options After Sexual Assault: Do Survivors Have to Report? The session will be held May 25th at 2pm ET. From the announcement: Access to healthcare after sexual assault can be critical to survivors beginning the healing process and to prevent long-term health consequences. Reporting the assault to law enforcement should not be a barrier to accessing this care. In 2005 the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) stated that victims of sexual assault must be provided access to a medical forensic exam free of charge and without being required to cooperate with law enforcement or participate in the criminal justice system.

Kim Day (SAFEta) and Leslie Hagan (DOJ) will be teaching the webinar. Register for it here.

Categories
Testimony

Getting Paid as an Expert Witness When You’re the Treating Clinician

I have been asked to address a question that seems to crop up frequently–should I charge attorneys for my time as an expert in court when I’m the treating clinician? There seems to be some difference of opinion about this, so sure, I’ll wade in and provide what will be, for some, an unsatisfying answer. No. And here’s why–you should be compensated by your own program for time preparing for and going to court, whether as part of your per case pay (some places roll that into the rate) or billing your program for that time on a case by case basis. When I’ve asked prosecutors close to me about their response to a treating clinician wanting to bill for their time providing expert testimony, they’ve universally shrugged and essentially said, “I’ll just subpoena them”, which obligates a clinician to appear, regardless of their feelings about being paid. I am a huge proponent of people being compensated fairly for work they do, and this is not a nurses-being-undervalued issue. Physicians who provide care to patients are also expected to show up in court without being paid additionally as experts by the requesting prosecutor’s office.  Our jobs include providing testimony for cases that go forward. We sign on for that when we hire into programs (managers: this is something you should be reinforcing to new hires). The National Protocol says it quite concisely: “It should be expected that examiners will be called on to testify in court as either fact and/or expert witnesses, even though in some cases, a plea bargain may be agreed upon, or the prosecuting attorney may decide not to try the case. Examiners should always conduct and document each examination knowing that legal testimony may ultimately be required.” Clinical programs should compensate clinicians for all aspects of the patient encounter, which in some cases includes courtroom testimony. And it’s a benefit to patients that you are an expert, and may be recognized as such by the courts. For those who don’t feel they are being fairly compensated for court appearances, that’s a negotiation with your organization, not the prosecutor’s office.

Now, should we be compensated by attorneys for cases in which we were not the treatment provider? Absolutely. And everyone should have a fee schedule they can provide should the opportunity to perform this type of expert consultation and testimony arise.

Some of you will undoubtedly disagree with me, and that’s cool–I’m happy to debate the merits of my opinion via email or in the comments. For those of you who have developed creative solutions for addressing this issue, by all means, I’d love to hear about it. Knowing how often I am asked about this issue, I am certain I wouldn’t be the only one.

Categories
Child Abuse

Supporting Deaf Child Survivors of Sexual Abuse

KIDSta has an upcoming webinar, Supporting Deaf Child Survivors of Sexual Abuse. The session will be held May 19th at 2pm ET. From the announcement:

Research has shown that Deaf children experience abuse and neglect at rates 1.5-3 times higher than hearing children. Compounding this problem, Deaf children experience an array of communication and cultural barriers when getting support from victim services, medical providers, and the criminal justice system. In this training, participants will learn about Deaf culture and communities in the United States and the implications for providing effective services and supports to Deaf survivors. Presenters will share research on the sexual abuse of Deaf children and discuss the many challenges these children face when getting support. Practical skills and resources will be shared to address these barriers and provide services that are culturally and linguistically specific.

Register for the webinar here.

Categories
Uncategorized

Since Last We Spoke, 5-1-17

So that whole full week at home for the first time since mid-February stuff that I mentioned last week? Yeah, that didn’t happen. Unexpectedly found myself on a tiny commuter plane with literally no notice on Thursday (seriously–got the call, plane was leaving in 2 hours and I was still in pajamas). So that meant I ended up working all weekend. But I’m home now; not entirely certain what life looks like *this* week (may have some work for the military, may not), but no matter what, I’m home. Speaking of travel, I’ve got a few gigs coming up over the next 5 weeks, and I’m hoping I’ll see some of you there–I’ll be in Tennessee next week (the 9th, with the super smart and hilarious Leslie Hagan) talking testimony, and I’m coming to Kansas June 5th for an advanced SANE day that focuses on a few different things. Looking forward to both. In the meantime, let’s talk about what I’ve been reading as of late, shall we? Here’s what’s caught my eye since last we spoke:

Several of you posted this piece about ERs (much could be applied to forensic programs, too)

No surprise, this

Emergency contraception, still not a guarantee for sexual assault patients

Outing a sexual harasser

This was a lovely read

An alternative to reading about the first 100 days

Thoroughly enjoyed watching this

The realities of climbing out of poverty

I was an English major, so yeah

Always nice to see one of our own rise to the top

Finally, a little humor for your Monday morning