Categories
Sexual Assault

Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault

IAFN is offering a free webinar next month, Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault. the session will be held April 25th at 2pm ET. From the website:

This webinar will define DFSA. It will review the drugs used, their signs and symptoms and prevalence. It will present details about specimen collection and will present the latest (2017) SOFT guidelines for laboratory analysis in DFSA cases.

Presented by: Teri Stockham, Ph.D.

Dr. Teri Stockham is a respected consultant, author and lecturer in the field of forensic toxicology. Over the past three decades, she has gained extensive education, training and experience both in the laboratory and the courtroom. The three degrees Dr. Stockham earned have all been focused in the specialty of forensic toxicology. She holds a Ph.D. from the Medical College of Virginia, and a Master’s degree from The George Washington University. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from Indiana State University. Her laboratory training, including the role as Chief Toxicologist for Broward County, Florida, complements her education and expertise. Dr. Stockham is experienced on the witness stand and has testified hundreds of times.

Dr. Stockham serves as a consultant to a number of law firms, providing her expertise for various court cases involving personal injury, insurance defense, probation/parole, court martial, DUI, workers compensation, child custody and drug-facilitated sexual assault. Her forensic toxicology services have encompassed a large number of clients who represent insurance companies, individuals, government agencies and healthcare providers.

Register here.

 

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Categories
Sexual Assault

Developing a SART in Indian Country

The Tribal Forensic Healthcare project has a webinar coming up, Developing a SART in Indian Country. It’ll be held April 18th at 3pm ET. All of their webinars are archived; CEUs/CMEs are available. From the site:

American Indian and Alaska Native women are raped at rates higher than any other race. Despite the alarming rates, sexual assault is still the most underreported crime. In response to this crisis occurring in Indian Country, tribal nations have been developing culturally appropriate programs and adapting existing response models to create appropriate responses to sexual assault.  One such model is the Sexual Assault Response Team (SART). SART establishes a multidisciplinary team that collaborates to create a coordinated response to sexual assault. Presenters will share their experiences, challenges, successes and the importance of developing practices and protocols that are responsive to the immediate needs of adult victims of sexual assault victims and overall benefits to the criminal justice response.

Register for the session here.

 

Our first offering in the FHO store, Injury Following Consensual Sex is now available. If you haven’t ordered a copy yet, you can find it here

Categories
Uncategorized

Since Last We Spoke, March for Our Lives Edition

Saturday was the remarkable March for Our Lives, and I am so grateful I could be a part of it. My daughter (plus a bestie), her dad, and his wife all came into town to participate. Truly, it was an epic day. We were down there early enough to be relatively close to the main stage, and the energy of the event was indescribable. From the first notes of Andra Day’s Rise Up, which kicked off the event, to the inspiring speeches by young people from around the country, I have never been prouder to be part of a crowd of 800,000 people (actually I’ve never been part of a crowd of 800,000 people, so). So today’s post is everything I saw and read since last we spoke (warning–there’s some redundancy amongst the links):

The editorial staff of MSD took over the Guardian; here’s their manifesto for change

Trauma and anxiety in the aftermath of gun violence (actually, it’s worth checking out all of Teen Vogue, because they are making it happen right now)

The loudest silence in the history of protest

The most powerful moments of the march

The 6 most powerful speeches of the March

Possibly the most punk rock moment of the event (I will never pretend away my nerves before speaking again)

From our local community newspaper: Naomi Wadler, remember that name.

Rick Santorum got dragged by ED and trauma clinicians on Twitter after his unhelpful advice for students

My daughter and her friend, Dylan:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’d like to see more of my photos, you’ll find them over on my Instagram

 

Our first offering in the FHO store, Injury Following Consensual Sex is now available. If you haven’t ordered a copy yet, you can find it here

Categories
DV/IPV

Intimate Partner Violence Among Transgender Youth

It’s rare that I post a single research article, but when the subject is one that rarely appears in the literature, it’s worth highlighting. So it is with this one, Intimate Partner Violence Among Transgender Youth: Associations with Intrapersonal and Structural Factors. It’s currently available free, full-text online ahead of print, so I would encourage you to download it now while it’s as accessible as it is (for those of you without library access to this particular journal). From the abstract:

Structural results found that TGNC youth experiencing extreme victimization, a history of incarceration, and participation in sex work were much more likely to report IPV. The only intrapersonal variable that was associated with IPV was depressive symptomatology; however, this relationship was strong, with participants being nearly eight times more likely to report IPV if they experienced symptoms of depression. Gaining a better understanding of the complexity of both structural and intrapersonal factors among TGNC youth will greatly inform the development of IPV prevention and services for TGNC youth experiencing this type of violence. 

View the full table of contents and abstracts from the current issue of Violence and Gender.

 

Our first offering in the FHO store, Injury Following Consensual Sex is now available. If you haven’t ordered a copy yet, you can find it here

Categories
Sexual Assault

Promising Strategies and Practices in Medical Forensic Compliance

(Apologies for the delayed notice on this one, but it just came across my desk)

Battered Women’s Justice Project has an upcoming webinar, Promising Strategies and Practices in Medical Forensic Compliance. The session will be held March 29th at 2pm CT. They archive their webinars, so if you can’t make it for the live session you should be able to find it online afterward. From the website:

This webinar will outline the key components of medical forensic compliance and what a compassionate and competent response to victims/survivors can look like. Challenges that many communities face with medical forensic compliance will be explored such as medical forensic exam access and quality, kit storage and testing, and statewide coordination issues. We will share what we have learned through our Statewide Medical Forensic Policy Program and some promising strategies and practices in medical forensic compliance.

PRESENTERS:
Caroline Palmer, Public and Legal Affairs Manager, Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault and Jude Foster, Statewide Medical Forensic Policy Program Coordinator, Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault.

Register here.

 

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Categories
Uncategorized

Since Last We Spoke, 3-19-18

Let’s see how this week will go, shall we? It’s started off on the crappier side, what with the immunization-induced malaise I’m currently rocking in anticipation of some overseas travel coming up in May. But I will be on the Hill tomorrow for a tick, and my kiddo is coming in for #MarchForOurLives on Friday, plus some reasonably fun work projects over the next couple days, so I have high hopes that the week gets better from here. Sasha was gone Sunday so I worked a good portion of the weekend. Still had a bit of time to surf, though. Here’s what caught my eye since last we spoke:

People with disabilities have been left out of the conversation

Abortion is safe, so says a landmark study

The lack of media coverage around this case is troubling

Woke America and Great America can learn from each other

More on the benefits of exercise

Maybe next time don’t joke about domestic violence

A revolution in pronoun norms

My favorite place to procrastinate has a great partnership with Time’s Up (and you, too, can record stories of your own)

 

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Categories
Testimony

Testimony Is an Essential Part of Forensic Practice

The issue of whether forensic clinicians have to testify, and if so, who determines whether they testify as a fact witness or an expert witness is one that we discuss regularly in these circles. I’ve written about it before; nothing in that post has changed. What I want to emphasize is that there are many areas in which clinicians and program managers lack control when it comes to testimony. But there is plenty over which you do have control. I would submit that in anticipating future testimony, a program has the ability responsibility to:

  1. Ensure that baseline education of all staff meets the minimum standards of practice as agreed upon in the field (to the extent that there is consensus, and understanding that some areas of practice lack consensus);
  2. Ensure that policies and procedures are in place, regularly reviewed, and again, consistent with the standards of practice as agreed upon in the field (see caveat in #1);
  3. Ensure that practices within the program have both a clinical rationale and an evidence base to support their use, particularly where consensus or guidance is lacking;
  4. Ensure that there is a quality assurance process in place so that if any mistakes were made, or a clinician deviated from policy, that issue is identified up front and the program has the opportunity to learn and grown from that issue;
  5. Ensure that the program’s medical director and institution’s administration understand that testimony is a part of practice and staff need to be compensated for their time*;
  6. Ensure that testimony prep happens–the exact questions may be unknown, but one can certainly anticipate the foundational questions and practice answering them ahead of time;
  7. Ensure that testimony is peer-reviewed–program managers and senior staff members should go to court with less experienced staff and provide feedback on that testimony afterward (please–not while still at the courthouse).  But seriously–no one is so experienced that they can’t afford some peer-review on their testimony.
  8. Ensure that if there are opportunities to observe the testimony of someone more experienced, staff take advantage of it and go. Testimony is not something one learns during the mock trial portion of the SANE/SAFE/SAMFE course. That is the place one is oriented to testimony. Honing testimony skills happens over the course of years, and there’s no better way to improve than to watch and to do.

I’m certain I haven’t covered everything, so by all means, add your own feedback in the comments. I love these conversations.

*It is not the responsibility of the prosecutor’s office to pay you for your time on the stand (or prepping to take the stand) unless they are hiring you as an expert on a case where you are not the treating clinician. If you’ve worked out this agreement with them in your community, fine, but it’s still not their responsibility. It should absolutely be the responsibility of the clinical program, and if you are spending your money on shiny new camera systems or other equipment, and not paying staff for expected activities, like continuing education and testimony, that is a fail in my book. Yep, I said it.

 

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Categories
Articles of Note Child Abuse DV/IPV Elder Abuse/Neglect Sexual Assault

Articles of Note: March 2018 Edition

Time once again for Articles of Note, our monthly romp through the newly published peer-reviewed literature. As always, this is not an exhaustive review, just what is particularly interesting to me as I wander my way through the new and relevant. Distribute as you see fit, just make sure to attribute appropriately:

 

 

Our first offering in the FHO store, Injury Following Consensual Sex is now available. If you haven’t ordered a copy yet, you can find it here

Categories
Sexual Assault

Post Exposure Prophylaxis to HIV: Make it Simple

IAFN’s SAFEta project has a webinar coming up next month, Post Exposure Prophylaxis to HIV: Make it Simple. The session will be held April 30th at 2pm ET. From the announcement:

Non-occupational post-exposure prophylaxis (nPEP) should be started rapidly after sexual assault. The CDC treatment guidelines have recommended guidelines in place for occupational exposure since 1996 and non-occupational exposure since 2005. Although the guidelines have been updated and streamlined in subsequent years, healthcare providers still struggle with providing CDC recommended nPEP. The AIDS Education & Training Center (AETC) Program Rural Health Committee, the Georgia Department of Public Health, the IAFN and the National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership has developed a Post-Sexual Exposure nPEP Toolkit. This webinar will provide an overview of the resources and materials that are provided in the toolkit and the circumstances when it should be used.

Objectives:

  1. Identify when HIV nPEP should be considered post sexual assault.
  2. Recognize recommended regimens of antiretroviral medications are for nPEP.
  3. List ways to obtain the materials provided in the toolkit for EDs and clinics serving patients who may experience sexual exposure to HIV.

Register here.

Categories
Uncategorized

Since Last We Spoke, 3-12-18

As is the nature of this work, I was supposed to be on the road the remainder of the month and now I am not traveling until the beginning of April. So, more time at home than I typically have, which is not a bad thing. This made for a very mellow weekend and plenty of reading time. Here’s what caught my eye since last we spoke:

These young women, they are doing incredible things.

And also

See–there’s data! (“Young women are more likely than young men to report one or more kinds of political activity over the past 12 months”)

Most certainly

When boys are victims

Seems as though we aren’t done with this yet

Love seeing our colleague doing such amazing things in the world

This is both thrilling and infuriating

The book was such a pivotal part of my childhood (and many of her others a pivotal part of my adult life); I cannot wait to see the movie.

Finally, we are going to attend the March with our daughter, her dad and other stepmom, and one of her besties. Anyone else coming to DC for it?

(BTW, anyone see this marvelous ad?)

Our first offering in the FHO store, Injury Following Consensual Sex is now available. If you haven’t ordered a copy yet, you can find it here

Categories
Child Abuse DV/IPV Elder Abuse/Neglect Sexual Assault

Working with Interpreters: Enhancing Communications with Individuals Who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Vera Institute’s Center on Victimization and Safety has a webinar coming up, Working with Interpreters: Enhancing Communications with Individuals Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. The session will be held March 20th at 2pm ET. This is a great topic that often is missed in basic educational courses, so I encourage people to register. Don’t know if it’s archived, but I am guessing so. From the registration:

Participants will learn to distinguish between interpreter qualifications, certifications, and specializations to ensure quality and appropriate language access delivery. Presenters will discuss interpreter codes of conduct, the roles of interpreters. They will highlight the importance of confidentiality, impartiality, and accuracy. Participants will gain practical strategies for working with interpreters and improving working relationships. Special interpreting needs will also be discussed.

Register here.

 

Our first offering in the FHO store, Injury Following Consensual Sex is now available. If you haven’t ordered a copy yet, you can find it here

Categories
Uncategorized

Intensity vs. Consistency

I think about sustainability a lot. So anytime I see something that I think can help improve the sustainability of programs, rest assured it will show up on this site. Like this video from the folks over at RSA; I think it makes a great point about successfully managing businesses, which forensic nursing programs are.

RSA – Simon Sinek – Intensity vs Consistency from Jocie Juritz on Vimeo.

In forensic nursing, intensity is represented by things like fancy new equipment. It’s exciting, but it doesn’t really do anything to make sure your program is going to go the distance. And it certainly doesn’t guarantee a better quality clinician or patient experience.

Consistency is regular staff meetings. Consistency is ongoing education. Consistency is about investing in people and not things. It’s one of the keys to sustainable programs, as we discovered in our project. New cameras and other equipment are fine, but they shouldn’t be where you prioritize your resources. Need a new camera? Maybe purchase one that has fewer bells and whistles and devote some of that money to IAFN membership or conference registration for staff. When you invest in your team, when you ensure they feel supported and have access to current research and practice updates, they are more likely to stick around. Your patients are more likely to have better experiences, and the exam is more likely to be done appropriately and consistent with standards of practice, which benefits the entire system.

 

Our first offering in the FHO store, Injury Following Consensual Sex is now available. If you haven’t ordered a copy yet, you can find it here

Categories
Sexual Assault

Which Initials Can I Use?

Every now and again I feel like it’s important to remind folks about the parameters for using initials after one’s name. It’s a regular issue, and those of you who conduct SANE training and/or manage teams are encouraged to review this with participants and staff.  You can find the whole post here.

[Related: certificate vs certification]

 

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Categories
Uncategorized

Since Last We Spoke, 3-5-18

I’m heading to San Antonio this week for a few days with the Army, but before I hop on a plane, here are a couple things from my weekend. One, a bit of insight: if you are going to play Cards Against Humanity, know that forensic nurses are uniquely situated to crush this game. We possess the perfect combination of appreciation for dark humor, and exposure to the vernacular of the day that allows us to dominate our opponents. I played with 3 prosecutors, a judge and a law enforcement analyst. I was a force 🙂 Second, if you haven’t seen Black Panther yet, get yourself to the theater. It was So. Good. Satisfying in every way.

Also, I read (and listened to) a few fascinating things on the interwebs this weekend. Here’s what caught my attention since last we spoke:

This made me feel a bit teary

These teens will save us all. Here’s part of the reason why they’re good at this.

How important is luck?

How much will we as a country lose out on if we don’t take action?

New WHO guidelines on the rights of women during childbirth

True character

A review of gun research

Why mansplaining is still a thing

How to keep going

Finally, if you have the time, I encourage you to listen to this piece. It’s very insightful, and terribly well done.

 

Our first offering in the FHO store, Injury Following Consensual Sex is now available. If you haven’t ordered a copy yet, you can find it here

Categories
Sexual Assault

The State of Modern Slavery in the U.S.: Trends and Tools for Law Enforcement and Victim Service Providers

The International Association of Chiefs of Police is hosting a webinar, The State of Modern Slavery in the US: Trends and Tools for Law Enforcement and Victim Service Providers. The session will be held March 14th at 3pm ET. From the announcement:

What does human trafficking look like in your jurisdiction and what is your agency doing to combat it? Who do you partner with to identify victims, refer them to needed services, and investigate and prosecute traffickers? On Wednesday, March 14, 2018, from 3:00 to 4:30 PM ET, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) will host a webinar for law enforcement and victim service providers to explore the 25 most common human trafficking business models in the U.S. identified by the National Human Trafficking Hotline. A panel of presenters will share resources and strategies for law enforcement and victim service providers to collaborate with the Hotline on human trafficking cases.

This webinar aims to:

-Increase awareness of human trafficking business models and typologies in the U.S.
-Enhance the capacity of law enforcement and victim service providers to identify victims and investigate cases through collaboration with the -National Human Trafficking Hotline and Polaris’s Disruption Strategies team
-Deliver practical resources to aid jurisdictions in disrupting human trafficking operations across the country
-Provide the opportunity to connect with National Human Trafficking -Hotline staff and Polaris’s Disruption Strategies team to obtain essential information to combat human trafficking

Presented by:
Elizabeth Gerrior, Data Quality & Reports Manager, Polaris
Sam Gillis, Case Analyst, National Human Trafficking Hotline, Polaris
Rochelle Keyhan, Director of Disruption Strategies, Polaris
Grant Snyder, Sergeant, Minneapolis Police Department

Moderated by:
Colleen Owens, Senior Research Associate, Urban Institute and John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Register for the webinar here.

 

Our first offering in the FHO store, Injury Following Consensual Sex is now available. If you haven’t ordered a copy yet, you can find it here