I’m working on this very issue right now here in the US, so I was very interested in reviewing the UK’s latest recommendations for the collection of forensic specimens from complainants and suspects (PDF), published last week by the Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine of the Royal College of Physicians. Additionally, if you go to their Publications page, you’ll find new guidance on labelling, operational procedures, and equipment, plus a new fact sheet for patients about follow-up care and other post-exam information (and not for nothing, but I noticed they are offering copper IUDs as one of their options for EC). Overall, I think there are more similarities than differences in the approaches between the US and the UK. Either way, fascinating and informative (there are a ton of links to follow in the specimen collection doc, for instance), and not just for our UK readers.

The Vera Institute’s Center on Victimization and Safety is hosting a webinar series, End Abuse of People With Disabilities. The first webinar is People First: Practicing Accessibility One Contact at a Time. It will be held February 16th from 2-3:30pm ET. Click through for information about the session and the other ones in the series:

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How nice to have a week at home before I hit the travel pretty hard. After a lovely (albeit brief) visit with my kid, I am looking at a week of hard core writing and editing before I depart for Fairbanks, AK next weekend. Not much downtime here. But sitting around the airport I had the opportunity to check out my various social media sites; here’s what caught my eye since last we spoke:

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NSVRC has reposted a previously published 10 Things post from FHO: Observations from Court. It is one of the more popular 10 Things posts I’ve done; if you haven’t seen it yet, check it out on their site.

The Tribal Forensic Healthcare project has 2 webinars coming up in February, both sexual assault case reviews. The pediatric one, Who Said What?!? Utilizing Case Presentations to Improve Pediatric Forensic Medical Evaluations, will be held February 3rd from 2-3:30pm ET. The adult session, Sexual Assault Examiner: Adult Case Review, will be held February 16th from 2-3:30pm ET. CEUs/CMEs will be available (although see the bolded note regarding intended audience for the peds webinar). Click through for details about both:

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I took a snow day yesterday, along with almost everyone else in the DC metro area. The government is still shut down today and cars are littering the roads around my neighborhood (although it stopped snowing Saturday night, as of this posting, I still haven’t seen a plow on my street). Technically, today is a snow day, as well, but there really aren’t too many of those for the self-employed. So back at work I am. I’ll be heading to CLE tomorrow for a quick visit with my kiddo, but today, the focus is Articles of Note. So without further explanation, here’s what’s new and noteworthy in the peer-reviewed journals. Click through for both the printable PDF and the link-friendly Word doc. As always, attribution, please, if you use or distribute my work.

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Seems like there’s a lot of training on the neurobiology of trauma as of late (not complaining). Here’s another one coming up, this time hosted by the National Crime Victim Law Institute. It will be held January 28th from 12-1:30pm PT (apologies for the late notice). Click through for details:

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OVC has a new public awareness video series available, Faces of Human Trafficking. It’s a series “intended to be used for outreach and education efforts of service providers, law enforcement, prosecutors, and others in the community. The series includes information about sex and labor trafficking, multidisciplinary approaches to serving victim’s of human trafficking, effective victim services, victims’ legal needs, and voices of survivors.” There’s also an accompanying discussion guide, and other resources, making this an excellent tool for multidisciplinary education. The series covers both sex and labor trafficking, and all 9 videos can be downloaded. You can view all of them here.

 

In conjunction with last week’s post about victim notification of untested sexual assault kits, NIJ has just released a new publication: Notifying Sexual Assault Victims After Testing Evidence. The document takes the best of the available evidence and offers up some excellent strategies for what has become an emerging topic. Worth your time, I recommend distributing widely among your multidisciplinary partners.

We’re off today because of the MLK holiday, and we’re getting the most out of this 3-day weekend checking off a whole lot odds and ends from our to-do list. Our house is under construction right now, so we’re limited in what we can do at home. But Internet access hasn’t been interrupted, and therefore much time has been spent online since last we spoke. Here’s what’s caught my eye:

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