2018 STD Surveillance Report

(1st week of Journal Club is live, so feel free to jump in; we’ll pose new questions each Tuesday.)

The CDC just released its 2018 STD Surveillance Report and it is grim. They’re reporting increases in chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis (including congenital syphilis, which is up 185% since 2014). Helpful to know as you are considering what services to provide, including testing vs presumptive treating, medication choices, etc. As always, consult your local health department as well to get an accurate picture of the incidence and prevalence in your own community.

Read the full report here.

Table of contents if you want to jump around or are interested in specific data.

Here are your state ranking tables.

And for those of you looking for PPT slides, you can find the full downloadable list here.

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Comments

  1. October 11, 2019 | 1:13 pm

    Hannah Pressler

    Disclaimer, I am child abuse PNP (now retired). This increase in congenital syphilis (185% from 2014-2018) reflects a complete and utter failure of our healthcare system. Testing for syphilis during pregnancy is routine. This increase reflects not only sexism-gender discrimination in health care but also cognitive bias and the quality of care provided by some providers of women’s heath including lay or professional midwives (not nurse midwives). This is a system’s issue that has to be remedied among providers and educators. This is not the 60s or early 70s when a good f**k was worth a shot of penicillin. For younger readers, that was the 1960s -1970s before HIV.

    Sorry about the rant but this affects not only the health of a woman but also and profoundly the health of her babe.

    Wohoo Maine! We had no reported cases of congenital syphilis, were 47th and 48th for GC and Chlamydia but 34th for primary and secondary syphilis.